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Quantifying Model Performance

Created Dec 22, 2021 (15:02) by Unknown User (Helen Gardner)

Computer-Systems "The quantitative aspects of..." models that are involved "in computer systems" specifically in "queuing networks." This concept deals with "the input parameters and performance metrics that can be obtained from the QN models. The notions of service times, arrival rates, service demands, utilization, queue lengths, response time, throughput, waiting time, and response time" are all included within the performance analyzation. (Menasce et al. 2004; 53) [Menasce, D. A., Almeida, V. A., Dowdy, L. W., & Dowdy, L. (2004). Performance by design: computer capacity planning by example. Prentice Hall Professional.]

Quasi-Experimental Design

Created Dec 22, 2021 (15:02) by Unknown User (Anonymous User)

Social-Research “A quasi-experimental design is one that looks a bit like an experimental design but lacks the key ingredient -- random assignment... With respect to internal validity, they often appear to be inferior to randomized experiments. But there is something compelling about these designs; taken as a group, they are easily more frequently implemented than their randomized cousins… Probably the most commonly used quasi-experimental design (and it may be the most commonly used of all designs) is the nonequivalent groups design. In its simplest form it requires a pretest and posttest for a treated and comparison group. It's identical to the Analysis of Covariance design except that the groups are not created through random assignment. You will see that the lack of random assignment, and the potential nonequivalence between the groups, complicates the statistical analysis of the nonequivalent groups design… [The second common form of quasi-experimental design is] regression-discontinuity design… an important and often misunderstood alternative to randomized experiments because its distinguishing characteristic -- assignment to treatment using a cutoff score on a pretreatment variable -- allows us to assign to the program those who need or deserve it most.” (Trochim 2006; web) [Trochim, W.K. (2006) Quasi-Experimental Design in the Web Center for Social Research Methods. Retrieved from: http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/quasiexp.htm]

Quick Response Research

Created Dec 22, 2021 (15:02) by Unknown User (Anonymous User)

Research conducted as quickly as reasonably and ethically possible after a disaster event for the purpose of collecting ephemeral information which would be lost after a relatively short duration of time (‘perishable data’). Quick Response Research often seeks to capture the physical, societal, and psychological state of the impacted area immediately after a damaging event. Clean-up, recovery operations, and recall bias are all reasons the information may not be capturable at later points in time. Decision-making, and short and long-term recovery may also be captured through Quick Response Research depending on the study objectives. For example, if a timestamp of recovery is needed at six-months post-disaster, or if a critical decision is being made at a specific point in time, then the associated data is also ephemeral and may be captured through Quick Response Research. Commonly referred to as ‘Quick Response Research’ in social sciences and policy sciences; may be referred to as ‘RAPID Reconnaissance’ in physical science and engineering research due to the RAPID funding mechanism from the National Science Foundation. [Michaels, S. 2003. Perishable information, enduring insights? Understanding quick response research in Monday, J. (ed.) Beyond September 11: An Account of Post-Disaster Research. Boulder, Colorado: University of Colorado, Natural Hazards Center, pp. 15-48. Available at http://www.colorado.edu/hazards/sp/sp39/]